Grace Hallenbeck

 

I'm a graduate student in the Curtis lab interested in how the brain represents certain information as more behaviorally relevant than other information. 

My research is focused on using fMRI to first identify regions of interest in the brain during working memory tasks and then using TMS to disturb these regions thereby demonstrating their causal role in working memory. 

[CV | github

 
 Cartoon depiction of how salience and relevance each impact priority maps

Cartoon depiction of how salience and relevance each impact priority maps

Visual cognition: priority maps

How does the visual system select items in the scene for further processing and guidance of behavior? A prominent theoretical framework posits that different scene elements are indexed according to their 'priority' in a series of interacting retinotopic maps. I seek to understand how manipulations of different factors, such as the visual salience and behavioral relevance of scene elements, alters neural activity patterns in visual, parietal, and frontal regions thought to support priority maps. By applying computational neuroimaging methods, we can reconstruct high-fidelity spatial priority maps from neural activity patterns, and quantify how those maps change across task demands